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Rehabilitation Dataset Directory: Dataset Profile

Dataset: Survey of Adult Transition and Health (SATH)

Basic Information
Dataset Full Name Survey of Adult Transition and Health
Dataset Acronym SATH
Summary

The Survey of Adult Transition and Health (SATH) is a nationwide survey looking at the health of young people ages 19-23 in 2007. It is a follow-back survey of individuals whose parents were interviewed in 2001 for the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN). These children were 14 to 17 years of age in 2001 and had been identified as having a special health care need. The main goals of the SATH are to examine the current health status and health care needs of the young adults to better understand their transition from pediatric health care providers to adult health care providers.

Key Terms

Children, Transition, Special health care needs, Health status, Follow-back survey, Information needs, Heath insurance, Adequacy of health insurance, Employment, Education

Study Design Longitudinal
Data Type(s) Survey
Sponsoring Agency/Entity

Department of Health and Human Services (HHS):

Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)

Health Conditions/Disability Measures
Health Condition(s)

NA

Disability Measures

Functional limitations (ADLs and/or IADLs), Independent living disability, Hearing disability, Work limitation

Measures/Outcomes of Interest
Topics

Transition to adult health care, Routine health care, Health care satisfaction, Forgone or delayed health care & reasons, Primary care, Care coordination,  Impact of health on work and school, Accommodations, Health insurance coverage & adequacy

Sample
Sample Population

SATH used a follow-back survey design, attempting to interview the young adults whose parents were originally surveyed in 2001 for the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN). In 2001 these children were 14 to 17 years of age and lived in English-speaking households; in 2007, the same subjects were young adults 19 to 23 years of age. 

Sample Size/Notes

1,865 

Unit of Observation

Individual

Continent(s) North America
Countries

United States

Geographic Coverage

National

Geographic specificity

State (note: based on 2001 location, sample size too small for state level analysis)

Special Population(s)

Children/Youth - transition age:19-23 at time of survey

Data Collection
Data Collection Mode

CATI (phone) interview or web based survey

Years Collected

2007

Data Collection Frequency

One-time survey 

Note: SATH is a followback to 2001 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN)

Strengths and Limitations
Strengths

Largest survey following up on transition aged youth with special health care needs. Identical variables collected in 2001 & 2007 allows comparisons over time. Focused on self report data from the young adult themselves. Public Use File (PUF) includes data from original 2001 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN) parent/guardian survey and the SATH.  

Limitations

Follow-back survey response rate was low 17.5%. Note this was primarily driven by inability to find contact information for the youth rather than refusals. The cooperation rate was 98% for individuals who were contacted. Because of sample design and response rate it is recommended to consider the SATH a purposive or convenience sample. Non-response bias: young adults who had not moved between 2001 and 2007 may be over-represented and may differ from  individuals who had moved. Making comparisons between 2001 NS-CSHCN  parent responses to in 2007 SATH young adult responses may be problematic given differing perspectives as well the 6 year time difference.

Data Details
Primary Website

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/slaits/sath.htm

Data Access

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/slaits/sath.htm

Data Access Requirements

Public Use Dataset

Summary Tables/reports

List of variables and raw frequencies:

ftp://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/slaits/sath2007/formatted_freqs/SATH_formatted_freqs.pdf

Data Components

NA

Similar/Related Dataset(s)

National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN)

Selected papers
Other Papers

Change in health status and access to care in young adults with special health care needs: results from the 2007 national survey of adult transition and health.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23298998

Youth with Special Health Care Needs: Transition to Adult Health Care Services

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4877694/

The Transition to Adult Health Care for Youth With Special Health Care Needs: Do Racial and Ethnic Disparities Exist?

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/126/Supplement_3/S129.short

Technical

Design and operation of the Survey of Adult Transition and Health, 2007.

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_01/sr01_052.pdf

List of variables:

ftp://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/slaits/sath2007/formatted_freqs/SATH_formatted_freqs.pdf


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The Rehabilitation Research Cross-dataset Variable Catalog has been developed through the Center for Large Data Research & Data Sharing in Rehabilitation (CLDR). The Center for Large Data Research and Data Sharing in Rehabilitation involves a consortium of investigators from the University of Texas Medical Branch, Cornell University's Yang Tan Institute (YTI), and the University of Michigan. The CLDR is funded by NIH - National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, through the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research, the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering. (P2CHD065702).

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